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        Neonatal and pediatric ventilators for use in intensive care

        Breathing systems used in pediatric and/or neonatal intensive care, for infants in need of respiratory support. These ventilators have CPAP and PEEP controls .These devices are mainly pressure controlled and time-cycled.

        Tips for Buying a Ventilator, Pediatric

        1. Pediatric ventilators should have time-cycled, pressure-limited operation and should offer assist/control and SIMV ventilation modes. Neonatal ventilators should also have the supplemental functions of pressure support or leak compensation and provide inverse I:E ratio, PEEP, and CPAP support.

        2. The following measures should be monitored by the pediatric ventilator: airway pressure, respiratory rate, I:E ratio, and minute volume; controls should be available for FiO2, PEEP/CPAP, flow, pressure, pressure level, tidal volume, inspiratory time, I:E ratio, pressure support, sensitivity, and pressure limit.

        3. Pediatric ventilators and neonatal ventilators should have audible and visual alarms available for the following events: peak inspiratory pressure (high and low), minute volume respiratory rate, gas supply loss, and power failure, all alarms should be distinct and easily identified.

        4. If users can adjust the alarm volume, they should not be able to turn it down so that the alarm is inaudible. When the alarm-silencing feature is acceptable, the alarm must reactivate automatically if the condition is not corrected. Whenever the alarm is silenced, a clear visual display should indicate which pediatric ventilator alarm is disabled.

        5. An oxygen analyzer should monitor the delivered oxygen or oxygen/air mixture. This should either be included with the pediatric ventilator or purchased separately and placed in line with the breathing circuit. Neonatal ventilator and pediatric ventilator alarms should be displayed or sound for concentrations outside the acceptable ranges.

        6. All controls should be clear with easy-to-understand functions. Misinterpretation of displays and control settings should not occur. Controls should be protected against accidental setting and sealed against fluid penetration. Fluid spills should not affect patient and operator safety and system performance.

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Ventilator, Pediatric, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        Operating Modes

        • Volume ventilator?
        • Pressure ventilator?
        • SIMV?
        • Pressure support?
        • Spontaneous/CPAP?
        • Pressure support?
        • Apnea-backup vent?

        Equipment Alarms

        • Gas supply loss?
        • Power failure?
        • Vent inoperative?
        • Low battery?
        • Self-diagnostic?
        • Does it include a compressor?

        Patient Alarms

        • O2 High/low minute volume?
        • Low inspiratory pressure?
        • High PIP?
        • High PEEP?
        • Loss of PEEP?
        • FiO2?
        • Apnea?
        • High continuous pressure/occlusion?
        • Inverse I/E?
        • High respiration rate?

        Neonatal and pediatric ventilators for use in intensive care

        Breathing systems used in pediatric and/or neonatal intensive care, for infants in need of respiratory support. These ventilators have CPAP and PEEP controls .These devices are mainly pressure controlled and time-cycled.

        Tips for Buying a Ventilator, Pediatric

        1. Pediatric ventilators should have time-cycled, pressure-limited operation and should offer assist/control and SIMV ventilation modes. Neonatal ventilators should also have the supplemental functions of pressure support or leak compensation and provide inverse I:E ratio, PEEP, and CPAP support.

        2. The following measures should be monitored by the pediatric ventilator: airway pressure, respiratory rate, I:E ratio, and minute volume; controls should be available for FiO2, PEEP/CPAP, flow, pressure, pressure level, tidal volume, inspiratory time, I:E ratio, pressure support, sensitivity, and pressure limit.

        3. Pediatric ventilators and neonatal ventilators should have audible and visual alarms available for the following events: peak inspiratory pressure (high and low), minute volume respiratory rate, gas supply loss, and power failure, all alarms should be distinct and easily identified.

        4. If users can adjust the alarm volume, they should not be able to turn it down so that the alarm is inaudible. When the alarm-silencing feature is acceptable, the alarm must reactivate automatically if the condition is not corrected. Whenever the alarm is silenced, a clear visual display should indicate which pediatric ventilator alarm is disabled.

        5. An oxygen analyzer should monitor the delivered oxygen or oxygen/air mixture. This should either be included with the pediatric ventilator or purchased separately and placed in line with the breathing circuit. Neonatal ventilator and pediatric ventilator alarms should be displayed or sound for concentrations outside the acceptable ranges.

        6. All controls should be clear with easy-to-understand functions. Misinterpretation of displays and control settings should not occur. Controls should be protected against accidental setting and sealed against fluid penetration. Fluid spills should not affect patient and operator safety and system performance.

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Ventilator, Pediatric, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        Operating Modes

        • Volume ventilator?
        • Pressure ventilator?
        • SIMV?
        • Pressure support?
        • Spontaneous/CPAP?
        • Pressure support?
        • Apnea-backup vent?

        Equipment Alarms

        • Gas supply loss?
        • Power failure?
        • Vent inoperative?
        • Low battery?
        • Self-diagnostic?
        • Does it include a compressor?

        Patient Alarms

        • O2 High/low minute volume?
        • Low inspiratory pressure?
        • High PIP?
        • High PEEP?
        • Loss of PEEP?
        • FiO2?
        • Apnea?
        • High continuous pressure/occlusion?
        • Inverse I/E?
        • High respiration rate?
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