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      Tips and Guidelines for Buying an Ambulatory Infusion Pump

      Infusion pumps with disposable syringe or bag reservoir, small enough to be worn by ambulatory patients. These pumps are used to deliver therapeutic drugs. They can deliver liquids intravenously, epidurally, or subcutaneously. The pumps have a battery powered mechanism (which includes peristaltic, syringe-driven, elastomeric, and osmotic mechanisms) for propelling the infusate, with a flow control mechanism, and a display for user prompts and alarm.

      Tips for Buying an Ambulatory Infusion Pump

      1. Ambulatory Infusion Pumps are used to deliver parenteral agents from syringes or collapsible bags. Their size should be small enough so that patients can comfortably wear or carry them. During sleep they should not disturb the patient, and during daily use they should not be conspicuous.

      2. Medical facilities should carefully select patients to ensure successful insulin infusion therapy. The patients should be motivated and mature with a history of good compliance with insulin therapy.

      3. All pumps should be able to run for at least 72 hours without draining the reservoir or depleting the batteries. Pumps should have a flow range of =100 mL/hr and maintain a flow accuracy of 5%. Ambulatory infusion pumps should be capable of operating in a continuous infusion mode, though it is desirable for pumps to offer additional modes. In a Peristaltic pump, a set of rollers pinches down on a length of flexible tubing, pushing fluid forward.

      4. Luer-lock fittings or integral tubing, distal air filters, and air-in-line detectors may be used as protection methods against air embolism in ambulatory infusion, ambulatory insulin pumps and peristaltic infusion pumps that can deliver from an external reservoir.

      5. Volumetric Infusion Pumps should detect an upstream occlusion and suspend infusion when downstream pressure is >=10 psi. The bolus volume released after an occlusion is cleared should be 0.5 mL.

      6. Volumetric Infusion Pumps can be utilized for continuous or intermittent delivery through clinically acceptable routes of administration such as: intravenous (IV), intra-arterial (IA), subcutaneous, epidural, or irrigation of fluid spaces applications

      7. Free flow protection should be part of any ambulatory and ambulatory infusion pump. Audible alarms should sound for all conditions that might interrupt infusion, including: high pressure/occlusion, low or depleted battery, reservoir-side obstruction, pump malfunction, air-in-line, and empty or near empty reservoir.

      8. Ambulatory Infusion Pump alarm volumes should be adjustable with settings loud enough for critical alarms and soft enough for social situations. The pumps should have data logs that can store up to 200 events including: volume delivered, program settings, error codes, alarms, and rate.

      9. Display screens in ambulatory insulin infusion pumps, volumetric infusion pumps and peristaltic infusion pumps should be clear and easy-to-read and should indicate: time, basal rate, bolus dose, and accumulated dose.

      10. All ambulatory insulin infusion pumps offered should be able to deliver basal flows of 5 to 100 U/day with a resolution of 2 U/day. The recommended ones are those with a bolus dose range of =25 U/bolus with a resolution of <=0.5 units.

      Questions for the Seller

      Before you purchase your Ambulatory Infusion Pump, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

      Controls

      • Is it programmable?
      • Reservoir unlocked?
      • Temp alarm silence?
      • Air-in-line?
      • Infusion near end?
      • Reservoir empty?
      • System malfunction?
      • Low battery?

      Transtelephonic

      • Status check?
      • Programming?

      Data Log

      • Display?
      • Printout?
      • Time/date stamp?

      Tips and Guidelines for Buying an Ambulatory Infusion Pump

      Infusion pumps with disposable syringe or bag reservoir, small enough to be worn by ambulatory patients. These pumps are used to deliver therapeutic drugs. They can deliver liquids intravenously, epidurally, or subcutaneously. The pumps have a battery powered mechanism (which includes peristaltic, syringe-driven, elastomeric, and osmotic mechanisms) for propelling the infusate, with a flow control mechanism, and a display for user prompts and alarm.

      Tips for Buying an Ambulatory Infusion Pump

      1. Ambulatory Infusion Pumps are used to deliver parenteral agents from syringes or collapsible bags. Their size should be small enough so that patients can comfortably wear or carry them. During sleep they should not disturb the patient, and during daily use they should not be conspicuous.

      2. Medical facilities should carefully select patients to ensure successful insulin infusion therapy. The patients should be motivated and mature with a history of good compliance with insulin therapy.

      3. All pumps should be able to run for at least 72 hours without draining the reservoir or depleting the batteries. Pumps should have a flow range of =100 mL/hr and maintain a flow accuracy of 5%. Ambulatory infusion pumps should be capable of operating in a continuous infusion mode, though it is desirable for pumps to offer additional modes. In a Peristaltic pump, a set of rollers pinches down on a length of flexible tubing, pushing fluid forward.

      4. Luer-lock fittings or integral tubing, distal air filters, and air-in-line detectors may be used as protection methods against air embolism in ambulatory infusion, ambulatory insulin pumps and peristaltic infusion pumps that can deliver from an external reservoir.

      5. Volumetric Infusion Pumps should detect an upstream occlusion and suspend infusion when downstream pressure is >=10 psi. The bolus volume released after an occlusion is cleared should be 0.5 mL.

      6. Volumetric Infusion Pumps can be utilized for continuous or intermittent delivery through clinically acceptable routes of administration such as: intravenous (IV), intra-arterial (IA), subcutaneous, epidural, or irrigation of fluid spaces applications

      7. Free flow protection should be part of any ambulatory and ambulatory infusion pump. Audible alarms should sound for all conditions that might interrupt infusion, including: high pressure/occlusion, low or depleted battery, reservoir-side obstruction, pump malfunction, air-in-line, and empty or near empty reservoir.

      8. Ambulatory Infusion Pump alarm volumes should be adjustable with settings loud enough for critical alarms and soft enough for social situations. The pumps should have data logs that can store up to 200 events including: volume delivered, program settings, error codes, alarms, and rate.

      9. Display screens in ambulatory insulin infusion pumps, volumetric infusion pumps and peristaltic infusion pumps should be clear and easy-to-read and should indicate: time, basal rate, bolus dose, and accumulated dose.

      10. All ambulatory insulin infusion pumps offered should be able to deliver basal flows of 5 to 100 U/day with a resolution of 2 U/day. The recommended ones are those with a bolus dose range of =25 U/bolus with a resolution of <=0.5 units.

      Questions for the Seller

      Before you purchase your Ambulatory Infusion Pump, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

      Controls

      • Is it programmable?
      • Reservoir unlocked?
      • Temp alarm silence?
      • Air-in-line?
      • Infusion near end?
      • Reservoir empty?
      • System malfunction?
      • Low battery?

      Transtelephonic

      • Status check?
      • Programming?

      Data Log

      • Display?
      • Printout?
      • Time/date stamp?
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