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        Hemoglobin analyzers

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        Tips and Guidelines for Buying a Glycohemoglobin Analyzer

        Laboratory analyzers using a separation technique based on charge differences, chemical analysis, or structural differences, to measure glycohemoglobin in whole blood. Point-of-care analyzers are mostly used for assessing glucose control in physicians office. Blood levels of GHB are the integrated value of the past three month period. GHB concentration can be measured using several methods, including photometry and immunoassay.

        Tips for Buying a Glycohemoglobin Analyzer

        1. Before purchasing a dedicated glycohemoglobin analyzer, facilities should determine the volume of specimens to be tested and the desirability of fractionating HbA1, since chemistry analyzers can also perform glycohemoglobin tests.

        2. Some of the less expensive options for measuring HbA1 or HbA1c may be manual column, electrophoretic, or general-purpose, high-performance liquid chromatography systems. These should be considered when the test volume does not warrant the purchase of a large automated hemoglobinometer.

        3. Facilities should also consider the time needed to develop a test procedure and prepare reagents when using an alternative hemoglobin A1c analyzer.

        4. Purchasing a dedicated glycohemoglobin analyzer may be justified in facilities with high-test volumes due to the loss of precision and the cost and time involved in setting up an alternative analyzer for frequent glycohemoglobin analysis.

        5. Hemoglobinometers with test methods based on a specific monoclonal antibody typically allow for the use of smaller test-sample volumes.

        6. Facilities should consider the amount of memory in some hemoglobin A1c analyzers that store results.

        7. The glycohemoglobin analyzers provide results within minutes, allowing physicians to discuss the results and treatment plans with patients immediately. They are easy to use and do not require highly trained staff.

        8. To prevent the expiration of large volumes of reagents that might not be needed in small-volume facilities, the reagents come in cartridges that are used on a per-patient basis

        9. Before deciding to buy glycohemoglobin analyzers, facilities should also look into the availability of service contracts.

        10. Facilities should know that some glycohemoglobin analyzer suppliers provide services such as maintenance and calibration, standard solutions, extended warranties, hotline services, and/or consolidated services.

        Tips and Guidelines for Buying a Glycohemoglobin Analyzer

        Laboratory analyzers using a separation technique based on charge differences, chemical analysis, or structural differences, to measure glycohemoglobin in whole blood. Point-of-care analyzers are mostly used for assessing glucose control in physicians office. Blood levels of GHB are the integrated value of the past three month period. GHB concentration can be measured using several methods, including photometry and immunoassay.

        Tips for Buying a Glycohemoglobin Analyzer

        1. Before purchasing a dedicated glycohemoglobin analyzer, facilities should determine the volume of specimens to be tested and the desirability of fractionating HbA1, since chemistry analyzers can also perform glycohemoglobin tests.

        2. Some of the less expensive options for measuring HbA1 or HbA1c may be manual column, electrophoretic, or general-purpose, high-performance liquid chromatography systems. These should be considered when the test volume does not warrant the purchase of a large automated hemoglobinometer.

        3. Facilities should also consider the time needed to develop a test procedure and prepare reagents when using an alternative hemoglobin A1c analyzer.

        4. Purchasing a dedicated glycohemoglobin analyzer may be justified in facilities with high-test volumes due to the loss of precision and the cost and time involved in setting up an alternative analyzer for frequent glycohemoglobin analysis.

        5. Hemoglobinometers with test methods based on a specific monoclonal antibody typically allow for the use of smaller test-sample volumes.

        6. Facilities should consider the amount of memory in some hemoglobin A1c analyzers that store results.

        7. The glycohemoglobin analyzers provide results within minutes, allowing physicians to discuss the results and treatment plans with patients immediately. They are easy to use and do not require highly trained staff.

        8. To prevent the expiration of large volumes of reagents that might not be needed in small-volume facilities, the reagents come in cartridges that are used on a per-patient basis

        9. Before deciding to buy glycohemoglobin analyzers, facilities should also look into the availability of service contracts.

        10. Facilities should know that some glycohemoglobin analyzer suppliers provide services such as maintenance and calibration, standard solutions, extended warranties, hotline services, and/or consolidated services.

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