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        Tips and Guidelines for Buying a Blood Bank Information System

        Computerized systems used in blood banks, providing clinical and administrative information. These data management information systems process blood bank information, including blood donor status, cross-match results, blood logistic management system, etc., using specialized software.

        Tips for Buying a Blood Bank Information System

        1. Many software features can be used with blood bank information systems; each facility should select the combination of features based on the intended use of the system in the facility.

        2. These systems should offer some basic features, including transfusion and donor functions, autologous unit tracking, cross match results, and other features to facilitate the running of a blood bank. Additional features should be considered based on specific needs.

        3. Information systems should offer methods for system security, such as password protection. They should be HL7 compliant. If the facility has an existing information system, interfaces to it are necessary. This feature is needed even if the facility is purchasing a stand-alone BBIS and considering an LIS or HIS in the future.

        4. Facilities should also look into the backup features and storage media provided by the systems. At minimum, storage onto a hard disk with RAID and/or an optical disk should be available.

        5. To increase database integrity and help prevent data loss, automatic backups and transaction logging are recommended.

        6. Before buying a system, facilities should first carefully evaluate their current operating process. Automation will not necessarily resolve inefficiencies if there are any. They should then define the objectives and functional requirements for the system and submit a request for proposal to suppliers.

        7. Buyers need to carefully examine current costs against the estimated reduction.

        8. Only systems that meet the needs of all the users in the facility should be considered.

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Blood Bank Information System, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        General

        • Software installed? (Name + Version)

        Software

        • Does it include clinical features?
        • Does it include transfusion?
        • Does it include donor?
        • Does it include autologous/direct unit tracking?
        • Does it include crossmatch results?
        • Does it include donor history?
        • Does it include mobile scheduling?
        • Does it have blood group device interface?
        • Does it include ad hoc reporting?
        • Does it include crossmatch/transfusion ratio?
        • Does it include management features?
        • Does it include inventory control?
        • Does it include bar coding?
        • Does it include RFID?
        • Does it include billing?
        • Does it include remote ordering?
        • Does it include remote results reporting?
        • Does it include a direct printer?
        • Does it include a fax?
        • Does it include a modem?
        • Does it include HIS interfaces?
        • Does it include order entry?
        • Does it include results reporting?
        • Does it include electronic signature?

        Blood bank refrigerators with temperature control and safety features for accurate temperature maintenance, for storage of whole blood, blood components, and reagents.

        Tips for Buying a Blood-Bank Refrigerator

        1. The most important factors to consider when looking at these blood-bank refrigerator systems are temperature and temperature-alarm systems.

        2. Doors of these laboratory refrigerator units should be made of thermal or multi-pane glass with heated wires to reduce condensation.

        3. A temperature monitoring system should come with the blood-bank refrigerator, and it should consist of at least one temperature sensor and an integral recorder. A more desirable configuration is two sensors and a combination of remote and integral recorders.

        4. An audible, on-unit alarm for temperature, low battery, and power failure should be provided by the laboratory refrigerator unit. Audible remote alarms are desirable as well as power and refrigeration back-up systems.

        5. Storage space is another issue to consider when buying these systems. Facilities should determine how much storage space is needed and whether the temperature-alarm system is included with the laboratory refrigerator or sold separately. A remote alarm system may be desirable.

        6. Regarding configuration, facilities must choose between blood-bank refrigerator units with refrigeration systems incorporated into their base or separate refrigeration systems that can be installed on top of the unit or placed remotely.

        7. Base-mounted laboratory refrigerator units require more frequent cleaning because of floor dust and dirt. Some laboratory refrigerators have key locks on the doors to restrict access to certain types of blood products. Some units have both a refrigerator and a freezer

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Blood-Bank Refrigerator, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        General

        Software installed? (Name + Version)

        General Condition

        • What is the isolation condition?
        • Is the temperature stable?
        • Are there any defects in the door seal?
        • Are there any signs of rust?

        Tips and Guidelines for Buying a Blood Bank Information System

        Computerized systems used in blood banks, providing clinical and administrative information. These data management information systems process blood bank information, including blood donor status, cross-match results, blood logistic management system, etc., using specialized software.

        Tips for Buying a Blood Bank Information System

        1. Many software features can be used with blood bank information systems; each facility should select the combination of features based on the intended use of the system in the facility.

        2. These systems should offer some basic features, including transfusion and donor functions, autologous unit tracking, cross match results, and other features to facilitate the running of a blood bank. Additional features should be considered based on specific needs.

        3. Information systems should offer methods for system security, such as password protection. They should be HL7 compliant. If the facility has an existing information system, interfaces to it are necessary. This feature is needed even if the facility is purchasing a stand-alone BBIS and considering an LIS or HIS in the future.

        4. Facilities should also look into the backup features and storage media provided by the systems. At minimum, storage onto a hard disk with RAID and/or an optical disk should be available.

        5. To increase database integrity and help prevent data loss, automatic backups and transaction logging are recommended.

        6. Before buying a system, facilities should first carefully evaluate their current operating process. Automation will not necessarily resolve inefficiencies if there are any. They should then define the objectives and functional requirements for the system and submit a request for proposal to suppliers.

        7. Buyers need to carefully examine current costs against the estimated reduction.

        8. Only systems that meet the needs of all the users in the facility should be considered.

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Blood Bank Information System, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        General

        • Software installed? (Name + Version)

        Software

        • Does it include clinical features?
        • Does it include transfusion?
        • Does it include donor?
        • Does it include autologous/direct unit tracking?
        • Does it include crossmatch results?
        • Does it include donor history?
        • Does it include mobile scheduling?
        • Does it have blood group device interface?
        • Does it include ad hoc reporting?
        • Does it include crossmatch/transfusion ratio?
        • Does it include management features?
        • Does it include inventory control?
        • Does it include bar coding?
        • Does it include RFID?
        • Does it include billing?
        • Does it include remote ordering?
        • Does it include remote results reporting?
        • Does it include a direct printer?
        • Does it include a fax?
        • Does it include a modem?
        • Does it include HIS interfaces?
        • Does it include order entry?
        • Does it include results reporting?
        • Does it include electronic signature?

        Blood bank refrigerators with temperature control and safety features for accurate temperature maintenance, for storage of whole blood, blood components, and reagents.

        Tips for Buying a Blood-Bank Refrigerator

        1. The most important factors to consider when looking at these blood-bank refrigerator systems are temperature and temperature-alarm systems.

        2. Doors of these laboratory refrigerator units should be made of thermal or multi-pane glass with heated wires to reduce condensation.

        3. A temperature monitoring system should come with the blood-bank refrigerator, and it should consist of at least one temperature sensor and an integral recorder. A more desirable configuration is two sensors and a combination of remote and integral recorders.

        4. An audible, on-unit alarm for temperature, low battery, and power failure should be provided by the laboratory refrigerator unit. Audible remote alarms are desirable as well as power and refrigeration back-up systems.

        5. Storage space is another issue to consider when buying these systems. Facilities should determine how much storage space is needed and whether the temperature-alarm system is included with the laboratory refrigerator or sold separately. A remote alarm system may be desirable.

        6. Regarding configuration, facilities must choose between blood-bank refrigerator units with refrigeration systems incorporated into their base or separate refrigeration systems that can be installed on top of the unit or placed remotely.

        7. Base-mounted laboratory refrigerator units require more frequent cleaning because of floor dust and dirt. Some laboratory refrigerators have key locks on the doors to restrict access to certain types of blood products. Some units have both a refrigerator and a freezer

        Questions for the Seller

        Before you purchase your Blood-Bank Refrigerator, we recommend you ask the seller the following questions:

        General

        Software installed? (Name + Version)

        General Condition

        • What is the isolation condition?
        • Is the temperature stable?
        • Are there any defects in the door seal?
        • Are there any signs of rust?
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